Welcome to the Community of Qiologicians

Evolve with us. Get deeper into the conversation. 

Join and Support

Walt Disney said “We don’t make movies to make money, we make money to make movies.”

I suspect you have a similar feeling about your acupuncture practice. And there is a lot you do in service of extending your skills and understanding so you can better help others heal. I hope the work I do with Qiological helps you with deepening your craft.

If you are here, you’re probably already a regular listener to Qiological. And you might be thinking about supporting the show by becoming a Qiologician

Any business enterprise requires financial stability if there is going to be long-term sustainability. So I’ve opened up this opportunity for you, the listener, to help Qiological grow into a resource that will both support our profession with learning and inspiration, and help us to better help our patients. You can get all the details in the audio above.
But in case you are the kind of person that prefers text to audio. Here are the highlights.

  • Supports the podcast by helping to cover the costs of equipment, software, internet hosting and services, production and some of my time that I’d otherwise be devoting to clinic.
  • It’s a way for you to say “thanks these podcast conversations bring value to my life and practice.”
  • Your support allows us to provide extra content that you’ll find only on the member channel.

 

I’ve heard it said that for something to be heard — it takes someone to speak and another to listen. Thank you for listening to Qiological, and if you would like to support the show so it has more resources to continue to expand and evolve, then please join and become a member of the community.

An Opportunity to 
Support Something You Love

Exclusive Podcasts for Qiologician Community

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Stalking the Wild Caterpiller Fungus • Jeff Chilton

Stalking the Wild Caterpiller Fungus • Jeff Chilton

Cordyceps is one of the precious medicinals of the Chinese medicine pharmacopeia. It’s a wild grown substance that has only recently begun to give up the secrets to how it can be cultivated so that its benefits can be enjoyed by more than a privileged few.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Qi Anatomy • Brenda Hood

Qi Anatomy • Brenda Hood

Qi anatomy includes our convential western science anatomy. And while it does not include the cellular minutia, it does give us a perspective that allows us to understand function and pathology through the lens of the five phases and six qi. And that can open up a lot of possibility.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum

We often consider the Five Phases when doing acupuncture, and the Six Conformations when treating our patients with herbal medicine.

In this conversation we consider the interplay of “wu yun, liu qi” the five movements and six climatic qi from the perspective of diagnosis and understanding not just what problem a patient has, but also its progression through time.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Slow Medicine: How Chinese Medicine Became Associated With the Treatment of Chronic Illness • Eric Karchmer

Slow Medicine: How Chinese Medicine Became Associated With the Treatment of Chronic Illness • Eric Karchmer

When I lived in China I’d often hear people there say “use western medicine for quick results, but use Chinese medicine for chronic conditions.” It was a bit confusing for me, as even as a student and new practitioner I’d see Chinese medicine be really helpful for more acute conditions. It made me wonder if the Chinese really understood Chinese medicine.

In this conversation we get some perspective on this issue. Listen into this discussion on how the clashing of cultures and China’s desire to “modernize” had an impact on the medicine we practice.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Moving Through Trauma: A Path of Healing and Resiliency • Alaine Duncan

Moving Through Trauma: A Path of Healing and Resiliency • Alaine Duncan

Trauma has both a physiological and emotional impact on us. It can set up a kind of dysregulation that while in the midst of trauma can be adaptive, and in fact help us to survive, but over time can be source of all kinds of physical and emotional problems. 

In this “part two” conversation we discuss the cycle of healing that can occur as patients move through the five phases of trauma and recovery. And how Chinese medicine, an understanding of modern neurobiology, and gentle hands on work can not only heal trauma, but help to build greater resiliency.  

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Channeling the Moon • Sabine Wilms

Channeling the Moon • Sabine Wilms

Chinese medicine has a long, long history of puzzling through and treating women’s health issues. In this conversation we touch on clinical considerations that come to us from the Song dynasty.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Exploring the Landscape of the Pulse • Peter Eckman

Exploring the Landscape of the Pulse • Peter Eckman

The pulse is emblematic of Chinese medicine. It is a highly subjective measure that helps us to orient in helpful ways toward a patient’s problem and their strengths.

While most any practitioner would tell you the pulse is vitally important in accessing a patient’s condition, the ways in which we can approach and interact with the pulse are wide and varied.

In this conversation we explore the pulse and how we as practitioners can use it as an exploration not just of the patient, but of our own process as well.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Taste Testing Different Herb Cooking Methods • Skye Sturgeon

Taste Testing Different Herb Cooking Methods • Skye Sturgeon

In school we learn about the traditional cooking method that involves multiple cookings using a clay pot.In this converation we compare the flavors generated in the clay pot with those from a pressure cooker, a slow cooker and a perculator.Listen in for a discussion of cooking methods and how they can change the flavors of the herbs you prescribe for your patients.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Mistakes and Discoveries- group discussion on learning Sa'am acupuncture

Mistakes and Discoveries- group discussion on learning Sa'am acupuncture

Mistakes and discoveries go hand in hand. And there is really no way to get it right in medicine without getting wrong on the way to getting right.This is another in a continuing series of conversations between Toby Daly and some practitioners who are actively engaged in learning the Sa’am acupuncture method.While we know that the practice of medicine requires of us constant study and sometimes diving into a new perspective, it is usually easier said than done.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Marketing in The Digital World • Marketing Mini-Series 5

Marketing in The Digital World • Marketing Mini-Series 5

We’ve all been on the “bad” of marketing. Have been subjected to intrusive and unskilled attempts at trying to convince us of something. It raises your hackles; it should.

Lots of us mistake advertising for marketing. But these two, which related, are different. Marketing is about how you communicate, how you represent your authentic self to the world, and how to better understand others so you can see if you might be able to help.

This content is restricted

To get full access you need to join the Qiologician Community

Thanks for listening
and for your support
of the podcast

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This
Malcare WordPress Security